My Final Take: The Unfortunate Consequence of the Satellite Camp Ban

There are, like, a million arguments for why the satellite camp ban sucks.

Conversely, not a single proposed argument in favor of the ban have been: good, valid, indicative of a person with an education, etc.

Whatever, it’s late.

Anyways, the prevailing arguments from either side of the question are; “Banning the camps limits exposure for kids who would otherwise never receive it.” vs. a plethora of off-base suggestions ranging from the amount of talent in the south compared to the north (which, of course, is to say the Big Ten footprint) to the apparently imminent risk of having too many camps which would be a “total circus” according to Ole Miss’ Hugh Freeze. 

But, let us not lose track of the most important factor in this equation. Satellite camps, more than anything else, will offer a kid the opportunity to attend a university. Period.

Some parents can afford to send their kids to college. Most college graduates, however, are stuck with massive student loans after graduating which can prove to be crippling for their future. It is an unfortunate reality. What’s worse, those who are most fortunate will have the opportunity to live this reality. Go figure.

If satellite camps give a kid gets the chance to attend a school like Marist or Cal State Sacramento because of satellite camps, what reason could you possibly have to ban them? That’s a potential college graduate (and who knows, both of those schools have produced NFL players) that would have otherwise struggled to even attend college, let alone graduate.

Limiting a kid’s chances to go to college and earn a degree is the real tragedy of the satellite camp ban. No matter how you spin it.

Isn’t going to college something we encourage young people to do? Why would we limit that?

“It’s a lot more than football,” said Jim Harbaugh to WXYZ-TV Detroit. “It’s an educational opportunity, and there’s nothing in this world that guarantees a successful future like education.”

“There is no other guarantee but education. And that is ultimately what we’re fighting for.” 

Aside from a chance to play college football, banning satellite camps takes the opportunity for an education away from a kid.

And that’s a tragedy.

Photo Credit: G.J. McCarthy/The Dallas Morning News

Harrison Rahajason
@ me, bro

Harrison Rahajason

Born and raised in Montreal, Canada (where Tim Biakabutuka comes from, you're welcome). Undergrad at Concordia University (the one in Montreal, not Ann Arbor) and a lifelong Michigan fan. Contributor for MGoFish.com. DONT TWEET RECRUITS
Harrison Rahajason
@ me, bro